Igbo

Igbo 2017-04-18T00:01:54+00:00

Igbo Translation Services

With a large network of in-country, professional Igbo translators, Verbatim Solutions can respond quickly and effectively to your Igbo language translation needs.

Verbatim Solutions provides professional, high quality Igbo to English translations and English to Igbo translations. Our Igbo translation services will help you maximize your global strategy.

Native Speaking Igbo Translators

Verbatim Solutions Igbo translation teams are professional linguists performing translation from English to Igbo and Igbo to English for a variety of documents in various industries including:

  • Aerospace
  • Automotive
  • Defense
  • Desk-top Publishing
  • E-Learning
  • Energy&Power
  • Finance
  • Gaming&Gambling
  • Government
  • Legal
  • Medical
  • Multimedia
  • Packaging
  • Rich Media
  • Software
  • Technical
  • Tourism
  • Telecommunications

About Igbo

Igbo is a language spoken in Nigeria by about 18 million speakers (the Ibo), especially in the southeastern region once identified as Biafra. The language was used by John Goldsmith as an example to justify going away from the classical linear model of phonology as laid out in The Sound Pattern of English.

Before the colonial period, the area which comprises modern Nigeria had an eventful history. More than 2,000 years ago, the Nok culture in the present Plateau state worked iron and produced sophisticated terra cotta sculpture. In the northern cities of Kano and Katsina, recorded history dates back to about 1000 AD. In the centuries that followed, these Hausa kingdoms and the Bornu empire near Lake Chad prospered as important terminals of north-south trade between North African Berbers and forest people who exchanged slaves, ivory, and kola nuts for salt, glass beads, coral, cloth, weapons, brass rods, and cowrie shells used as currency.

In the southwest, the Yoruba kingdom of Oyo was founded about 1400, and at its height from the 17th to 19th centuries attained a high level of political organization and extended as far as modern Togo. In the south central part of present-day Nigeria, as early as the 15th and 16th centuries, the kingdom of Benin had developed an efficient army; an elaborate ceremonial court; and artisans whose works in ivory, wood, bronze, and brass are prized throughout the world today. In the 17th through 19th centuries, European traders established coastal ports for the increasing traffic in slaves destined for the Americas. Commodity trade, especially in palm oil and timber, replaced slave trade in the 19th century, particularly under anti-slavery actions by the British Navy. In the early 19th century the Fulani leader Usman dan Fodio brought most areas in the north under the loose control of an Islamic empire centered in Sokoto.